WELCOME TO THIS BLOG


"All humans seek the illusive touch of another's Soul, which opens us to the sense of belonging to something bigger than the self. Dr. Kortsch has given us the true "tao" of relationship in this brilliant exploration of emotional tapestry. We will be grateful for this illumination of spiritual partnership for generations to come." Chris Griscom, Spiritual Leader, Author

"Eloquent and comprehensive, showing how your primary love relationship may be a sacred vessel that transports you and your partner to a place of mutual healing and expansion." Robert Schwartz, Author: Your Soul's Gift: The Healing Power of the Life You Planned Before You Were Born

"The Tao of Spiritual Partnership is a unique blend of wit and wisdom; Dr. Kortsch encourages us to take responsibility for our relationships, while recognizing and seizing the opportunities for our own personal spiritual growth." William Buhlman, Author of Adventures Beyond the Body

Monday, October 29, 2012

Five Things You Should Not Expect to Get From Your Relationships (Unless You Already Supply All of Them For Yourself)


  1. Happiness

  2. Fulfilment

  3. Satisfaction

  4. Security

  5. Happy-Ever-After


For much more about relationships and about understanding that for a successful relationship, happiness must first be supplied by the self (as opposed to seeking it through the partner), see my new book The Tao of Spiritual Partnership which is now available in paperback version. The Kindle version will be released near the end of November 2012.

To download the first chapter, click here

From the Description on Amazon: More exciting than any other kind of relationship you have ever known, spiritual partnership is a path, a Tao, available to you so that you may transform your life. Spiritual partnership becomes background music to daily life allowing you to enhance the process of your growth and evolution.

This ground-breaking book addresses:

• relationship patterns that hold you back from a truly fulfilled life
• the strong connection between sexuality and spiritual partnership
• communication leading to true connection & lasting transformation of your relationship

It is precisely at the problematic crossroads so often encountered in relationships that we are offered the opportunity to create a new foundation based on mutual complementarity rather than need; a free relationship between two people who want to be together, rather than two people who need to be together. Needing another, we are told, is the measure of love, but for a fully conscious individual nothing could be further from the truth. And therein lies part of the secret and healing power of spiritual partnerships. 


Praise for The Tao of Spiritual Partnership 

“All humans seek the illusive touch of another's Soul, which opens us to the sense of belonging to something bigger than the self. Dr. Kortsch has given us the true "tao" of relationship in this brilliant exploration of emotional tapestry. We will be grateful for this illumination of spiritual partnership for generations to come." 
Chris Griscom: Spiritual Leader, Author 

“Eloquently and comprehensive, showing how your primary love relationship may be a sacred vessel that transports you and your partner to a place of mutual healing and expansion.” 
Robert Schwartz: Author of Your Soul’s Gift: The Healing Power of the Life You Planned Before You Were Born 

"The Tao of Spiritual Partnership is a unique blend of wit and wisdom; Dr. Kortsch encourages us to take responsibility for our relationships, while recognizing and seizing the opportunities for our own personal spiritual growth." 
William Buhlman, Author of Adventures Beyond the Body 




Also have a look at my earlier book Rewiring the Soul: Finding the Possible Self (paperback or Kindle).

To download the first chapter, click here

From the Description on Amazon: Ask anyone, whatever their circumstances, if their life is vibrant, fulfilling, harmonious and happy. An honest reply is likely to be 'no', because to answer a truthful 'yes' is no mean feat. Only to grow psychologically and emotionally is not enough. And only to grow spiritually is not enough either. All three dimensions need to be developed in order to realize your full potential. If you are willing to assume total responsibility for the self and to start what is an on-going journey, you will quickly begin to glimpse the first fruits of the ultimate goal: inner well-being, freedom, peace, harmony and joy. This book sets out the pathway to self-mastery and self-discovery and walking that pathway will be the most exciting adventure of your life.

Friday, October 26, 2012

Five Things Relationships Are Good For



  1. Learning

  2. Growth

  3. Understanding yourself better

  4. Working out unresolved issues from your past

  5. Becoming more of what you are capable of being


For much more about relationships, see my new book The Tao of Spiritual Partnership which is now available in paperback version. The Kindle version will be released near the end of November 2012.

To download the first chapter, click here

From the Description on Amazon: More exciting than any other kind of relationship you have ever known, spiritual partnership is a path, a Tao, available to you so that you may transform your life. Spiritual partnership becomes background music to daily life allowing you to enhance the process of your growth and evolution.

This ground-breaking book addresses:

• relationship patterns that hold you back from a truly fulfilled life
• the strong connection between sexuality and spiritual partnership
• communication leading to true connection & lasting transformation of your relationship

It is precisely at the problematic crossroads so often encountered in relationships that we are offered the opportunity to create a new foundation based on mutual complementarity rather than need; a free relationship between two people who want to be together, rather than two people who need to be together. Needing another, we are told, is the measure of love, but for a fully conscious individual nothing could be further from the truth. And therein lies part of the secret and healing power of spiritual partnerships. 


Praise for The Tao of Spiritual Partnership 

“All humans seek the illusive touch of another's Soul, which opens us to the sense of belonging to something bigger than the self. Dr. Kortsch has given us the true "tao" of relationship in this brilliant exploration of emotional tapestry. We will be grateful for this illumination of spiritual partnership for generations to come." 
Chris Griscom: Spiritual Leader, Author 

“Eloquently and comprehensive, showing how your primary love relationship may be a sacred vessel that transports you and your partner to a place of mutual healing and expansion.” 
Robert Schwartz: Author of Your Soul’s Gift: The Healing Power of the Life You Planned Before You Were Born 

"The Tao of Spiritual Partnership is a unique blend of wit and wisdom; Dr. Kortsch encourages us to take responsibility for our relationships, while recognizing and seizing the opportunities for our own personal spiritual growth." 
William Buhlman, Author of Adventures Beyond the Body 




Also have a look at my earlier book Rewiring the Soul: Finding the Possible Self (paperback or Kindle).

To download the first chapter, click here

From the Description on Amazon: Ask anyone, whatever their circumstances, if their life is vibrant, fulfilling, harmonious and happy. An honest reply is likely to be 'no', because to answer a truthful 'yes' is no mean feat. Only to grow psychologically and emotionally is not enough. And only to grow spiritually is not enough either. All three dimensions need to be developed in order to realize your full potential. If you are willing to assume total responsibility for the self and to start what is an on-going journey, you will quickly begin to glimpse the first fruits of the ultimate goal: inner well-being, freedom, peace, harmony and joy. This book sets out the pathway to self-mastery and self-discovery and walking that pathway will be the most exciting adventure of your life.

Monday, October 22, 2012

Lost In the Woods


As a child, getting lost in the woods is probably the makings of a worst nightmare. Where is mother? Where is the path? Nothing is recognizable. Why is it so dark? The trees loom so menacingly. The silence is terrifying, but it gets even scarier when there are sudden, unfamiliar forest noises that come from sources that become more and more menacing the longer one imagines what they might be.

As adults we feel something like that when we lose our way. Something happens in life (a diagnosis of cancer, the death of a loved one, the loss of a job, a major financial loss, a life-threatening illness of a child, the loss of a partner to divorce or abandonment, the outbreak of war, a kidnapping, maybe you lost your home to fire, a hurricane, tornado, or earthquake, maybe you are the victim of identity theft, perhaps you just realized that everything you believed about yourself is not true, etc), and suddenly we feel not only that we are in unfamiliar territory, but that we can not, no matter how hard we try, see a clearly delineated pathway. Darkness abounds, and we truly feel not only that we are in a dark night of the soul, but that none of the familiar landmarks that have served us in the past, are available to us now.

Some individuals, under such circumstances, succumb to victim thinking or to depression, become ill themselves, or in some other way allow this to undo them.

Many others, however, choose another path.

Choosing another path literally means that: finding a new path in the darkness, finding a new path to take you through the woods, even if you don't definitively know that it will actually bring you to the edge of the forest and into the light. All you do know, however, is that if you stay put, if you remain stuck in the place in which you are, nothing will change, and you are not doing anything about your predicament.

It is literally a question of using the darkness and the sensation of being lost to find a new path.

That means being willing to think differently than before the calamitous or earth-shattering event. That means being willing and able to embrace out-of-the-box thinking, which literally means being pro-active about the way one looks at each and every one of the problems - and solutions - that are currently on the table.

Being willing to think out of the box requires being pro-active, self-motivated, and above all, aware of what it was - at least in part - that caused the current circumstances. If they were force majeure and totally out of your hands, such as in the case of a hurricane, it may mean looking at what was lost dispassionately and with detachment, rather than from the point of view of the loss. The position you choose to take regarding your loss or problem, will in many ways determine the kind of eventual outcome you will have, and the speed with which it will come.

Being willing to think out of the box also requires being willing to leave your comfort zone. Yes, I know you have already been thrown out of your comfort zone by the calamity, but you may still choose to remain in it as you go about picking up the pieces of your life in order to put your life back together again as closely as possible to the way it was before. That may not be the best alternative. It's as they say: if you have lemons, make lemonade. So in this sense, leaving your comfort zone may mean to re-think your life on totally different and unknown terms. You may be surprised how much better it winds up feeling to you, even though at first it is all very strange. But growth, change, progress, and transformation tends to come about as we venture out into unknown arenas, and above all, defy our fear of risk and failure. (See also my August 2007 Newsletter: Making Fear of the Unknown Work For You).

Being willing to think out of the box also means being prepared to start making use of your intuition, if you have not already done so. (See also my May 2006 Newsletter: Introducing Our Second and Third Brains: We Do Think With Our Heart and Instinct). Your intuition can literally be one of the most potent tools you can use in order to get back on track. Scientists have conclusively proven (see the article cited in this paragraph) that we have billions of neural cells in our heart and gut, the former dealing with a type of emotional intelligence, and the latter with an intuitive intelligence. Both of these "brains" supply the rational brain (the one in our head) with information - frequently the second and third brains process the information before the rational brain does. Is this not proof enough for you to begin to make use of that fount of information you have been neglecting: your intuition? Is it not proof enough for you to want to begin to develop this as much as the intelligence you have originating in your brain?

Being lost in the woods hence becomes - in simple terms - a situation of which you can choose to take advantage in order to discover new avenues of expression, new avenues of understanding, and new avenues of growth.


Friday, October 19, 2012

Compassionate Detachment


A friend recently told me about some deep troubles. This wasn't even a client. It was a friend, and yet, I remained within a mindset that some (especially Buddhists) call compassionate detachment.

Compassionate detachment might be defined as the manner in which we relate to others when we allow them to deal with their own problems and they are therefore free to choose to become responsible for their own issues, while simultaneously we express a loving concern for the nature of their current predicament, and also simultaneously we are not invested in the outcome (this definition is the compilaton of numerous definitions of the expression found on the web).

The operative words here are that we remain detached enough so that we do not step in to attempt to resolve their problem, their pain, their issue for them.

It does not mean we care less for them. It does not mean they - and the outcome - are not important to us.

On the contrary, it means we care so much, that we deliberately step back - much like the anxious parent observing a baby take its first tottering steps will also step back in order to let the baby manage on its own - so that the other person will come to that point where they decide to resolve for themselves.

Clearly - just as in the case of the baby, where we are on the lookout for sharp table corners or dangerous steps, where the baby might hit his head or fall down - we are also lovingly present to help the individual with a problem or an issue.

But not to rescue.

When we get into rescue mode, we are generally working for our own agenda:

  • We may need to feel in control

  • we may need to feel strong and invincible

  • We may need to get the payback of the other person's gratitude for what we did

  • We may need to get the payback of allowing ourselves to feel good about ourselves becasue of what we did (because without it, we find it hard or impossible to feel good about ourselves)
So as rescuer, we are generally not working so much on the other person's issue, as on our own...
Another reason to be compassionately detached is to realize that some persons leach our very life energy out of us ... in their need to discuss their problems, and in their need to be listened to ... over and over and over again ... they become energy vampires. Your will know very quickly when you are with someone like that, because you will feel weak in some fashion after spending some time with them.
So what does that mean?
  1. You are not compassionately detached

  2. You have very poor boundaries because you are willing to listen to something so draining over and over again telling yourself that you are being a good friend, or wife or husband, or mother, etc., while in fact you are enabling the other person's sense of helplessness or of being a victim of life or cirumstances.
You are a much better friend, a much better partner, parent or child, and also - a much better therapist, counselor, healer - if you remain compassionately detached, and in that fashion promote self-responsibility and autonomy of action in the other individual.

Monday, October 15, 2012

Making Life Easier By Deciding To Do So


Life truly is difficult.

Things tend to go wrong for me.

I'm just not so lucky.

Nobody every got anywhere without very hard work.

Do you recognize some of these thoughts? If not exactly the same, then other, similar ones? Are you convinced that life is hard?

Try to imagine the number of times a day you tell yourself that. The number of times a day, as you go about whatever it is you do, that you figuratively nod your head, thinking: yep, this is just another thing that proves how tough things are for me.

Or maybe you try to escape from those awful thoughts, and go about your day, your week, your year by pretending it is not so, only to fall into a hole because you forgot to watch out for those deep, black holes that life prepares for us and because of that you started remembering once again how hard things are.

Either way ... life keeps showing you over and over again that things are hard.

But I posit that there is another way. And by taking me up on my suggestions, the actual events of your life won't change - at least not at first - but what will change is how you see those same events. And then, because you take a new stance, bit by bit, other things will begin to change, and then perhaps, you will begin to notice that life is not so hard after all.

Let's take, for example, a morning that started badly. Your alarm clock didn't work (it's electric, and the electricity went off during the night for 45 minutes). Then, as you raced out the door with no breakfast and a shower that might not have been one, you bang your knee on the door jam, and it's the same knee that started giving you trouble several weeks ago when you slipped and fell on the freshly waxed floor at work. As you get into the car, you realize you told yourself last night while driving home, that you would get gas this morning, that you would get up 15 minutes earlier to have time to do so, but you forgot. So now you need to waste more time doing that, and have not a hope in hell to get to work on time.

Doesn't that prove that life is hard?

OK...so let's take another look. Nothing is different, all you're going to do is decide to look at if from another angle. You are going to find something positive in the events of this day.

Perhaps you will decide that you should have an alarm clock that's not dependent on electricity. (OK, I agree, that's not particularly mind-shattering). Or perhaps you'll decide that you should not leave for tomorrow what you can do today (don't leave the empty tank to be filled tomorrow on the way to work). That one is already a bit more different. In actual fact, if you put that one into action on a consistent basis (not putting off until tomorrow what you can accomplish today, or said in other words, planning more efficiently), you may find that much in your life will change.

Now take it a step further. Make the decision to look at all those things that make life appear to be so hard from the point of view that there is something in there of value for you, something that can take you further down the road to a better, more growth-oriented life. Make the decision that no matter what happens to you, no matter what the circumstance, you will do your utmost to find something in it that can take you a step further, that can move you into a more rich and satisfying life. There is always something new to learn and understand and those events that heretofore you have classified as the proof of life being hard, can now become the events that show you the direction in which you can grow.


Friday, October 12, 2012

Ships in the Harbor are Safe


John Shedd, an American professor and author, wrote this in his book Salt From My Attic:

A ship in harbor is safe, but that's not why ships are built.

It's not a point that needs to be belaboured, but I believe we can all take a tip from it. Don't stay in your harbor of safety ... go out to explore new worlds, even if you fear a flat world, or dragons that may eat you alive ... if you don't, you'll never know what was really out there, but if you do, you may discover a whole new world.

Image: Caral, Peru, the oldest known city of the Americas

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Here's Why We're Happy (And Why Not)


View this 28 minute video found on TED with Daniel Gilbert, psychologist extraordinaire, as he speaks about happiness. The title of the talk is Why are we happy? Why aren't we happy?



If you experience difficulty viewing it, please click here to see it directly at TED.

Monday, October 8, 2012

Forgiving & Healing


So much has been said about the need to forgive if you really want to heal. Here is a nine minute video by Caroline Myss, an excerpt from one of her seminars, available as a book (Why People Don't Heal) or as a CD by the same name, about the topic.



If you have trouble seeing it, click here to see the video in YouTube.

Friday, October 5, 2012

The Puritan Work Ethic, Wu-Wei, and is Life Really Meant to be a Struggle?


Work hard and you will succeed.
Little by little does the trick. (Aesop)

Do every act of your life as if it were your last. (Marcus Aurelius)

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. (Aristotle)

Sound familiar?

Work Hard to Succeed

Many of us were taught sayings such as these and others along similar lines from early childhood. We know we have to work hard in order to succeed. We know that the hardworking ant will be able to survive the winter, while the grasshopper will not (and might try to scam the ant in order to get some free “stuff”). We know we will sow what we reap, and in order to reap a good harvest, we have to put in a hard day’s work.

Or do we? Maybe we’re just looking at the whole thing through a pair of smudged glasses.

Puritan Work Ethic

The Puritan (or Protestant) work ethic is a work ethic that was based on the moral values of hard work. It meant that working hard entailed giving service to God. It implies, albeit by inference, that the harder one works, the more moral one is. Hence, having been raised to believe this, some people feel guilty if they are not working hard all the time. It is as though hard work were equated with being a good person, and furthermore, if one works hard enough, one will in all likelihood have a positive result not only in the moral arena, but also in the more mundane, worldly one.

This can play havoc with the manner in which people deal with their vacation or free time, as during such a period, theoretically, one is not working, And yet we’ve all seen people working on their laptops at the beach, or reading a heavy business tome or corporate financial statement on a pleasure cruise. Are they all workaholics, or simply people who feel guilty if they aren’t working most of the time?

This can also confuse your sense of self esteem and accomplishment, because evidently many people work very hard, and are very good people indeed, and yet they are nowhere near financial or professional success.

Thinking Out of the Box

Far be it from the purpose of this article to convince you to slack off and become successful by lounging in a hammock on a palm-studded beach as you sip a piña colada. My intention is not to separate you from your hard-working self. It is simply to help you think out of the box with regards to how you look at hard work. Perhaps hard work is not all it’s made out to be. Perhaps we need to focus on working less in order to make our hard work bring greater success. If that sounds like a conundrum, read on.

Wu-Wei

Wu-wei is a term from Taoist philosophy meaning “non-action” or “non-doing”. In Fritjof Capra’s Uncommon Wisdom: Conversations with Remarkable People, it is referred to as ”not working against the grain of things, of waiting for the right moment without forcing anything unduly.” Capra speaks of remaining alert and focused on one’s purpose in order to achieve success in one’s endeavour. You might say that wu-wei refers to working hard at going with the flow, or simply, at going with the flow.

An example from everyday life might apply to someone who is starting a business. Working hard in the Puritan work ethic sense would be to start early every morning and work until late every night, going down every possible road, and if pitfalls arose, to batter through them, to break down any impediment, and to keep on until every avenue were explored. Hardships would be endured, obstacles annihilated, no stone left unturned in order to find the way to make the business a success. Should, despite such hard work, success still be elusive, one might say “well it wasn’t for lack of trying”.

Going With the Flow

Here’s how the wu-wei alternative might play itself out: the same person is starting a new business. Working hard would not necessarily mean the long hours as much as long thinking and being alert to opportunities. Realizing that when one avenue gets blocked, rather than trying very hard to break up the blockage, it might be wiser to go down another, more readily flowing and open avenue, in order to find a potential benefit there. It might mean working hard at becoming aware of what was playing itself out around one, in order to flow with those particular circumstances and benefit from them, rather than going against the flow and having to work so hard to break down obstacles and barriers. Remaining aware of the focus; remaining aware of the intention, and being open to whatever may open up at any given moment seems to make much more sense than to blindly “plug on” simply because hard work reaps success. The next time you are out in the countryside, watch a leaf floating down a stream. What happens when it gets stuck in some rocks? It allows the current to left it off the rocks, away from the obstacles, and continue down where the water runs smoothly, where it can travel more easily, because it is going with the flow.

Is Life Really Meant to be a Struggle?

Stuart Wilde wrote an extraordinary little book in the 80’s called Life was Never Meant to be a Struggle. In it he extols the virtues of understanding that if most of your life you have been told, and then continue telling yourself that life is meant to be a struggle, you will most definitely end up believing that. So then, if something works easily for you, you won’t want to believe it’s for real…you will mistrust the ease with which you accomplished it, and hence, needing to feel that in order for you to accomplish something worthwhile, you have to work hard for it, you will sabotage your easily won victory. Why? So that your outer life conforms to your inner expectations or beliefs.

Sound familiar? Apply this to business, money, love and relationships, spirituality, health, keeping age at bay, body weight, and any other area of potential struggle you care to name.

So what does Wilde suggest?

Inner Freedom

Identify the causes of struggle in your life, and recognize that struggle is actually a programmed response. Struggle is akin, in many senses, to anguish about the area of life in which you are struggling. Whenever there is a programmed response – in this case struggle - it will take some time and practice to re-program yourself – in this case to a more flowing response. Eckhart Tolle (The Power of Now) writes “Accept – then act. Whatever the present moment contains, accept it as if you had chosen it. Always work with it, not against it. Make it your friend and ally, not your enemy. This will miraculously transform your whole life”.

Going to a state of instant peace whenever you feel anxious, worried, angry, or afraid moves you from your body to your mind and emotions, and finally to your spirit. Similarly, Wilde says that in order to achieve freedom from struggle, you just need “the ability to place yourself in a non-confrontational mode” with all issues in your life, both internal and external to yourself. As you become more and more positive and balanced, struggle begins to give way to inner calm. “Inner calm allows you to pull more and more opportunities to yourself because energy seeks its own kind.” James Allen (As A Man Thinketh – contact me to get the free e-book) says “All that a man achieves and all that he fails to achieve is the direct result of his own thoughts”.

Imagine dealing with life and all you do in it as though you were a child playing a game. Is there any reason it can’t be like that? Any reason it shouldn’t be like that? Imagine if your work; whatever it is you do in life were like an enjoyable game. That every day when you got up, you would be looking forward to playing this game again. And imagine furthermore, that this wonderful game were what gives – in part – meaning to your life! (See also my article Finding a Meaning For Your Life).

So it stands to reason that keeping your thoughts balanced, positive, and energetic will go a lot further towards bringing you that which your strive for, rather than arduous struggle. Achieving inner freedom by getting such a handle on your thoughts will go a long way towards achieving the outer freedom for which we all yearn.

Photo: Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Taking Responsibility For Your Unhappiness


Yeow!

That is not a fun title.

Taking responsibility for your unhappiness sounds like there's no one and nothing left to blame. And that - of course - is what this is all about.

When you are unhappy, it is because you have chosen to be so due to someone not behaving the way you wanted them to, or something not turning out the way you might have it expected to. So life did not go your way. Things simply weren't the way you wanted them to be.
  • your partner forgot your wedding anniversary
  • your boss did not promote you
  • you wanted to go to the beach and when you opened the curtains, you saw it was raining
  • you expected to be able to find the car of your dreams for the budget you had stipulated, and then realized it would cost much more. So now you have to make do with a lesser car
  • you thought the person you had dinner with the first time two nights ago would call you by today, and they have not done so
  • you expected your son to help you with the garden this weekend and he went out with his friends instead
  • you expected your best friend to help you set up your party, and it turns out she forgot!
And so - understandably - you are unhappy.

And of course you believe you are unhappy because of what the other person did or did not do, or because of the situation that did not turn out the way you would have liked it to.

And that is precisely where you need to begin to take responsibility for your unhappiness.

How?

By taking responsibility for your happiness. So if you are unhappy about something, you are the one who can change how you feel. Either by choosing to change how you feel about something. how you think about something, how you view something, or by choosing to do something that will raise your energy to levels where you are able to once again feel happy.

Your happiness is in your hands. If you leave it in the hands of the acts and deeds of others, or in the manner in which situations in your life turn out, you are not free.

Freedom implies being in charge of your happiness.

Monday, October 1, 2012

Your Addictions


Today it's not about alcohol. And it's not about cocaine, or cigarettes, or heroin, or shopping, or sex.

Today's question is about being judgemental. Or being critical of others. Or about being self-critical. Or about caring what others think. Or about needing the approval of someone, or about being addicted to the presence of someone.

You can be addicted to so many modes of behaviour that have nothing to do with substance abuse, and yet whose effects on you are just as pernicious. And about which you have to decide to undertake just as much work as you would if you were abusing a substance. Because they can ruin your life just as surely as being an alcholic can do so.
Remaining addicted has a lot to say about your comfort zones, your difficulty in leaving them, your fear of new modes of behaviour because of the way that will change you. Self discovery, self transformation and making choices also all involve the potential for much fear because of the risk of failure is always there ... you don't know where you are going on this new path, you feel it will take you out into uncharted waters, and so being human - you tend to pull back into the addiction.
Think about it.

It's your life, and only you can decide, and only you can make the choices to begin the road to change. And therein lies freedom.

Photo: Chichen Itzá, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico